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mid-week roundup

Mid-week roundup

Some recent news happenings in the world of citizenship:

  • Samoans seek U.S. citizenship.
  • With the November elections approaching, CIRCLE’s Peter Levine takes a look at some different ways people view the right to vote.
  •  At Vanity Fair, Paul Goldberger defends Frank Gehry’s proposed Eisenhower Memorial
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    Mid-week roundup

    Some recent happenings in the citizenship world:

  • Writing in The Atlantic, Conor Friedersdorf disagrees with Thomas Ricks’s proposal for a draft.
  • There are less than two weeks left before the National Conference on Citizenship’s Civic Data Challenge officially closes on July 29.
  • Meghan Clyne at National Affairs draws lessons in liberty and citizenship from Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Little House series.
  • A recent survey looks at the connection between participation in online communities and increased civic engagement.
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    Mid-week roundup

    Some recent items of note:

    • Former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor has created a sample civics curriculum for the Washington Post.
    • Mike Feinberg, co-founder of the Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) charter school system, has an article in The Atlantic in which he uses the KIPP system as an example of what can happen when teachers and administrators are freed to try out new ways of teaching students.
    • Over at the Army’s blog, Chaplain (Maj.) Carlos C. Huerta has a moving account of dealing with PTSD upon his return home from Iraq, and he encourages other soldiers to seek help.
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    Mid-week roundup

    What’s happening in the citizenship world? Here’s a mid-week roundup of recent tidbits we found interesting:

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    Mid-week roundup

    Mid-week roundup:

    • Inside Higher Ed has an interview with Christopher P. Loss, author of the new book Between Citizens and the State: The Politics of American Higher Education in the 20th Century. As Loss explains, “One of the key arguments of the book is that during the 20th century the federal government turned to intermediary institutions to create administrative capacity in a political culture fearful of ‘big government.’ I contend that higher education was one of those intermediaries — it served as a key site where citizens learned about their government and the government, as a chief sponsor of higher education, learned about its citizens.”
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    Mid-week roundup

    A mid-week roundup:

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    AEI