Search Results

You have searched the AEI Citizenship blog archives for 'diana schaub'. If you are unable to find anything in these search results, try to rephrase your search. The search results are presented below.

Eisenhower memorial criticism all around

As criticism of the proposed memorial has grown, so too have attacks on the critics. Writing in the Architectural Record about the Program’s recent event on memorials, Ben Adler characterized the monument’s critics as simply conservative “curmudgeons” who will “always revile Modernism for both ideological and aesthetic reasons.”

Responding to Adler in the same journal, the Program’s Gary Schmitt and Cheryl Miller write, “In defending architectural Modernism, Adler falls into the very trap he warns against.”

Read More...

Event re-cap: Monumental Fights


Missed Friday’s discussion on “Monumental fights: The role of memorials in civic life”? Don’t worry–you can watch the video of the event here, read about it it in the Washington Examiner, or check out our event re-cap.

Read More...

The problems with Gehry’s Eisenhower Memorial

In our preparation for May 18’s discussion panel at AEI on “Monumental Fights: The Role of Memorials in Civic Life” (register at the link), we bring you another essay by a panel participant discussing the importance of proper memorials to honor our great statesmen. In this selection from First Things, Eric Wind and Erik Bootsma, both of the National Civic Art Society (with whom we are co-sponsoring the event), raise concerns about Frank Gehry’s proposed Eisenhower Memorial and the way the design process was conducted.

Read More...

Upcoming event: Monumental Fights

Over the past year, the recently dedicated Martin Luther King Jr. (MLK) Memorial and the planned Eisenhower Memorial have renewed controversy about the meaning and purpose of public memorials. What do America’s memorials and monuments tell us about our nation and our identity as citizens? How should we memorialize past events and individuals? In this event, co-sponsored by the Program on American Citizenship and the National Civic Art Society, a distinguished panel will address these questions and comment on the MLK and Eisenhower memorials.

Read More...

A rather old constitution

As we noted in February, according to a study by David S. Law and Mila Versteeg, the “U.S. Constitution appears to be losing its appeal as a model for constitutional drafters elsewhere.” Indeed, when Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg visited Egypt earlier this year, she remarked that we in America have “a rather old constitution” and that, instead of looking to it for guidance in constitution writing, one might instead look at the constitutions of South Africa or the European Convention on Human Rights.

Read More...

Celebrating Washington’s birthday

George Washington was born on this day, February 22, in 1732. Today, take some time to read from his Farewell Address, which he delivered on September 19, 1796, before retiring to Mt. Vernon after completing his second term as President of the United States.

Read More...

Event re-cap: First Among Equals


At an event on Friday sponsored by the AEI Program on American Citizenship in celebration of George Washington’s birthday, leading American political thinkers came together to discuss Washington’s  presidency and the importance to the nation of having a time set apart to remember and appreciate its founders.

Read More...

Mid-week roundup

Mid-week roundup:

  • Inside Higher Ed has an interview with Christopher P. Loss, author of the new book Between Citizens and the State: The Politics of American Higher Education in the 20th Century. As Loss explains, “One of the key arguments of the book is that during the 20th century the federal government turned to intermediary institutions to create administrative capacity in a political culture fearful of ‘big government.’ I contend that higher education was one of those intermediaries — it served as a key site where citizens learned about their government and the government, as a chief sponsor of higher education, learned about its citizens.”
    Read More...

Upcoming Event: First Among Equals

The third Monday in February has come to be known–wrongly–as Presidents’ Day, an annual excuse for a three-day weekend and big-ticket sales. In one of a series of events and conversations about the meaning of the American calendar, Amy A. Kass (Hudson Institute) and Leon R. Kass (AEI) seek to restore America’s fading national memory with a celebration of the holiday by its original and proper name: Washington’s Birthday.

Read More...

The Significance of Veterans Day

From The Weekly Standard: What exactly do we celebrate on Veterans Day? To be sure, we mean to honor the brave men and women, living and dead, who have fought America’s battles, past and present. But honor them how, and for what? About these matters, we lack a clear national answer.

Read More...

Take Time to Remember

From the Weekly Standard: American identity, character, and civic life are shaped by many things, but decisive among them are our national memories—of our long history, our triumphs and tragedies, our national aspirations and achievements. Crucial to the national memory are the words our forebears wrote, to show us who we are and what we might yet become. Robust citizenship is impossible without national attachment. National attachment is thin at best without national memory. And national memory depends on story, speech, and song.

Read More...
AEI