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Mid-week roundup

What’s happening in the citizenship world? Here’s our mid-week roundup:

  • World War II veteran Raymond Smith, age 92, finally received his high school diploma
  •  Last week, the United States military reached 2,000 dead in the Afghanistan conflict.
  •  In July, Gary Gutting, a professor of philosophy at the University of Notre Dame, posed the question: Is patriotism moral?
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    Mid-week roundup

    Some recent news happenings in the world of citizenship:

  • Samoans seek U.S. citizenship.
  • With the November elections approaching, CIRCLE’s Peter Levine takes a look at some different ways people view the right to vote.
  •  At Vanity Fair, Paul Goldberger defends Frank Gehry’s proposed Eisenhower Memorial
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    Mid-week roundup

    Some recent happenings in the citizenship world:

  • Writing in The Atlantic, Conor Friedersdorf disagrees with Thomas Ricks’s proposal for a draft.
  • There are less than two weeks left before the National Conference on Citizenship’s Civic Data Challenge officially closes on July 29.
  • Meghan Clyne at National Affairs draws lessons in liberty and citizenship from Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Little House series.
  • A recent survey looks at the connection between participation in online communities and increased civic engagement.
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    Mid-week roundup

    Some recent items of note:

    • Former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor has created a sample civics curriculum for the Washington Post.
    • Mike Feinberg, co-founder of the Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) charter school system, has an article in The Atlantic in which he uses the KIPP system as an example of what can happen when teachers and administrators are freed to try out new ways of teaching students.
    • Over at the Army’s blog, Chaplain (Maj.) Carlos C. Huerta has a moving account of dealing with PTSD upon his return home from Iraq, and he encourages other soldiers to seek help.
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    Mid-week roundup

    Some recent happenings in the citizenship world:

    • The National Conference on Citizenship (NCoC) continues to release state-level civic health indexes, most recently for Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Alabama.
    • Writing in The Atlantic, Lindsay Windsor and Arthur Rizer argue in favor of the Stolen Valor Act, a law passed by Congress in 2006 that makes it a crime to lie about being awarded a military honor, such as the Purple Heart or the Medal of Honor.
    • New York Times columnist Nicholas D. Kristof has a moving article examining the extreme hardships faced by returning veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder.
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    Mid-week roundup

    What’s happening in the citizenship world? Here’s a mid-week roundup of recent tidbits we found interesting:

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    Mid-week roundup

    Mid-week roundup:

    • Inside Higher Ed has an interview with Christopher P. Loss, author of the new book Between Citizens and the State: The Politics of American Higher Education in the 20th Century. As Loss explains, “One of the key arguments of the book is that during the 20th century the federal government turned to intermediary institutions to create administrative capacity in a political culture fearful of ‘big government.’ I contend that higher education was one of those intermediaries — it served as a key site where citizens learned about their government and the government, as a chief sponsor of higher education, learned about its citizens.”
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    Mid-week roundup

    A mid-week roundup:

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    Mid-week roundup

    What’s happening in the citizenship world? Here’s a mid-week roundup of recent tidbits we found interesting:

    • The Center for Information & Research on Civic Learning and Engagement (CIRCLE) has a number of recent findings about youth voting behaviors. We’ve covered their ambitious report “Understanding a Diverse Generation: Youth Civic engagement in the United Statesbefore, but they’ve since come out with more information–including a comparison of the number of young (18-29 year old) voters to those over 65 (in case you were wondering, there are more of the former); an analysis of current voter registration by young Americans in key battleground states as compared to the 2008 voting cycle (the number of new, young Democratic voters have dropped); and a look at youth voting in the Iowa Caucus.
    • Peter Levine–the director of  CIRCLE–shares this research and offers some lessons in an op-ed published in the Cedar Rapids Gazette–now available in full at Peter’s blog.
    • And finally, we shared this with our Facebook friends last week, but the story is too good to not post about here: Air Force ROTC cadet Matt Pirrello, who lost his entire right leg in a training accident, is still determined to become a pilot. Read about his inspiring journey here.
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    Mid-week roundup

    Mid-week roundup:

    • More on the Eisenhower Memorial: The Washington Post has a favorable review of the proposed memorial, hailing architect Frank Gehry for his innovation, playfulness (“Gehry has produced a design that inverts several of the sacred hierarchies of the classic memorial, emphasizing ideas of domesticity and interiority rather than masculine power and external display…”), and democratic style (the focus on Eisenhower’s childhood shows that while “Eisenhower was a great man, […] there were other Eisenhowers right behind him, other men who could have done what he did, who would have risen to the occasion if they had been tapped…”). If you’re looking for a view on the memorial different than the ones we’ve presented thus far, this review is worth reading.
    • Continuing our citizenship lessons from abroad, Program Director Gary Schmitt has a post remembering Vaclav Havel, the former president of the Czech Republic who died on Sunday. As Schmitt recounts, “The fact that Europe today is virtually ‘whole and free’ is in no small way due to the life’s work of one man, Vaclav Havel.”
    • Harvard’s Institute of Politics has some new polling data on Millenials’ views of politics and public service.
    • And finally, the Washington Post reports that military voting has increased since 2006, and found that 77 percent of troops registered to vote in the 2010 election–compared with 65 percent of Americans at large who registered. Despite these gains, though, more than 112,000 military voters never received the absentee ballots they requested for the 2010 voting cycle.
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    Mid-week roundup

    Mid-week Roundup:

    • Happy 375th  birthday to the National Guard (yesterday)! Watch this video to learn more about the Guard, its founding and history, and the crucial role it plays in defending America today.
    • Curious about what’s happening with the proposed Guard seat at the Joint Chiefs of Staff? This article provides some good background and updated news.
    • A good reminder from USA Today that the horrors and challenges of war aren’t simply physical, and don’t stop at the battlefield: the military divorce rate reached its highest level this year since 1999, with nearly 30,000 marriages ending in divorce in 2011.
    • As Peter Levine points out, the American Commonwealth Partnership (ACP) has unveiled its new website, DemocracyU. The site works to present students’ stories of civic activism, and holds discussion and debate on the role that students play in civic engagement and service. Check it out.
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    Mid-week roundup: civic engagement and technology

    A mid-week roundup of civic-related happenings we found interesting:

    • CommonPlace and NextDoor are two new (to us) online sites that act as bulletin boards for real-life local communities. The goal is to facilitate community engagement by providing a place where neighbors can share information, ask for help, plan meetings, and organize service projects–among other things–that form the basis for local civic life.  The Social Capital Blog has a good introduction to these sites, and the folks at e-democracy discuss similar efforts.
    • The Pew Research Center came out with new findings this week on “Why Americans Use Social Media.” Roughly two thirds of users (the total number of which comprise about 66% of all American adults) use platforms like Facebook and Twitter mainly to stay in touch with family members and friends.
    • Past Pew research shows that about 20% of adults use the Internet to talk to neighbors and keep informed about community issues.
    • Our friends at the National Council on Citizenship (NCoCinterview John Bridgeland, author of the new book Heart of a Nation: 9/11 & America’s Civic Spirit.

    Send us more things to feature in the next roundup!

    Chart credit: Pew Research Center

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    What’s happening in the citizenship world?

    We’ve not had a roundup of news bits from the citizenship world in a while, so here are some recent items that we found interesting:

    • According to the Pew Research Center, youth engagement with politics is down, compared to this time in the 2008 presidential election cycle.
    • The good news, though, is in the “Power of the Ask”.
    • In September, the Library of Congress unveiled the new Congress.gov, to replace the old THOMAS database.
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    Stolen Valor Act ruled unconstitutional

    In addition to releasing its opinion on the Affordable Health Care Act yesterday, the Supreme Court also issued its decision in United States v. Alvarez, deciding that the Stolen Valor Act violated the First Amendment of the Constitution.

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    Monumental Egos

    In the April issue of The American Spectator, AEI’s Roger Scruton joins the long line of criticism in arguing against Frank Gehry’s design for the Eisenhower Memorial.

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    Remembering Eisenhower’s greatness

    The on-going saga of the Eisenhower Memorial continues, which we’ve covered before here, here, and here. Now, conservative commentators George Will, Ross Douthat, and David Frum join the line of critics who think that Frank Gehry’s design to commemorate the nation’s  34th president misses the point.

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