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Bruce Cole to Join Eisenhower Memorial Panel

Former chairman of the National Council of the Humanities and adviser to the National Civic Art Society Bruce Cole has been named to the Eisenhower Memorial panel, AP News reports. Cole has been an outspoken critic of Frank Gehry’s “metal tapestry” design, and will join a panel of 10 other commissioners to oversee the project’s development.

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Rescuing the Eisenhower Memorial

In the continuing saga over the proposed Eisenhower Memorial, new Congressional legislation would halt any additional federal funding for Frank Gehry’s design and send the memorial back to its planning phase. (Read more background on the memorial controversy here.)  Congressman Rob Bishop (R-Utah), the chairman of the House Subcommittee on Public Lands and Environmental Regulation, introduced the bill, which Susan Eisenhower—Ike’s granddaughter—supports. “We are very respectful that this is a memorial for the American people,” she told the congressional committee last week. “I think we might be in a different position if the public hadn’t been so very strongly against this design.”

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House Appropriations Subcommittee denies Eisenhower Memorial funding

In the latest in the long saga regarding Frank Gehry’s proposed design for the Eisenhower Memorial (more background here), yesterday the House Appropriations Subcommittee on the Interior, Environment and Related Agencies unveiled a draft bill that would deny the $59.8 million budgetary request by the Eisenhower Memorial Commission.

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Eisenhower memorial criticism all around

As criticism of the proposed memorial has grown, so too have attacks on the critics. Writing in the Architectural Record about the Program’s recent event on memorials, Ben Adler characterized the monument’s critics as simply conservative “curmudgeons” who will “always revile Modernism for both ideological and aesthetic reasons.”

Responding to Adler in the same journal, the Program’s Gary Schmitt and Cheryl Miller write, “In defending architectural Modernism, Adler falls into the very trap he warns against.”

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Revising Eisenhower–and his Memorial

The Washington Examiner reports that revisions to the proposed Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial will be revealed on Tuesday.

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The problems with Gehry’s Eisenhower Memorial

In our preparation for May 18’s discussion panel at AEI on “Monumental Fights: The Role of Memorials in Civic Life” (register at the link), we bring you another essay by a panel participant discussing the importance of proper memorials to honor our great statesmen. In this selection from First Things, Eric Wind and Erik Bootsma, both of the National Civic Art Society (with whom we are co-sponsoring the event), raise concerns about Frank Gehry’s proposed Eisenhower Memorial and the way the design process was conducted.

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Remembering Eisenhower’s greatness

The on-going saga of the Eisenhower Memorial continues, which we’ve covered before here, here, and here. Now, conservative commentators George Will, Ross Douthat, and David Frum join the line of critics who think that Frank Gehry’s design to commemorate the nation’s  34th president misses the point.

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Remembering Memorial Day

Our friends at What So Proudly We Hail are remembering Memorial Day with a new ebook of stories, speeches, and songs—featuring classic American writers and great American statesmen.

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Washington: The Classical City

Last June, the Program on American Citizenship teamed with the National Civic Art Society to present a panel discussion on the important role that memorials play in civic life, using the recent controversies over the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial and the proposed Eisenhower Memorial to guide the conversation. You can watch the full discussion between panelists Michael J. Lewis (Williams College), Roger Scruton (AEI), Bruce Cole (Hudson Institute) and Diana Schaub (Loyola University Maryland) here. In the January 17th issue of the Witherspoon Institute’s Public Discourse, the National Civic Art Society continued the conversation.

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Mid-week roundup

Some recent news happenings in the world of citizenship:

  • Samoans seek U.S. citizenship.
  • With the November elections approaching, CIRCLE’s Peter Levine takes a look at some different ways people view the right to vote.
  •  At Vanity Fair, Paul Goldberger defends Frank Gehry’s proposed Eisenhower Memorial
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    Doing right by Ike

    In the last few weeks, The Weekly Standard has published two articles discussing Dwight D. Eisenhower and the proposed memorial in honor of him, designed by architect Frank Gehry.

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    Monumental Fights: The Role of Memorials in Civic Life

    Over the past year, the recently dedicated Martin Luther King Jr. (MLK) Memorial and the planned Eisenhower Memorial have renewed controversy about the meaning and purpose of public memorials. What do America’s memorials and monuments tell us about our nation and our identity as citizens? How should we memorialize past events and individuals?

    At an event on Friday, May 18, 2012, that was co-sponsored by AEI’s Program on American Citizenship and theNational Civic Art Society, a distinguished panel discussed the important role of public memorials in civic life, using the recent controversies over the Martin Luther King Jr. (MLK) Memorial and the proposed Eisenhower Memorial to guide the conversation.

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    The follower problem

    In today’s New York Times, David Brooks takes a look at how the monuments we build reflect our national character–and how, given the disappointment of recent monuments (e.g., the World War II, FDR, MLK Jr., and the proposed Eisenhower Memorial), more thought about that leadership would be a good thing.

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    Event re-cap: Monumental Fights


    Missed Friday’s discussion on “Monumental fights: The role of memorials in civic life”? Don’t worry–you can watch the video of the event here, read about it it in the Washington Examiner, or check out our event re-cap.

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    Celebrating Armed Forces Day

    “On Armed Forces Day, let us salute the Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines, and Coast Guardsmen who perform their duties with impeccable courage, commitment, and character, and recognize our moral obligation to serve them and their families as well as they have served us.”

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    Frank Gehry’s latest design changes

    Yesterday, the Eisenhower Memorial Commission saw a revised proposal for the Eisenhower Memorial, designed by architect Frank Gehry. (More background on the proposal’s controversy here and here.)

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    The Decline of American Monuments

    As we look forward to our May 18 discussion panel on “Monumental Fights: The Role of Memorials in Civic Life” (register at the link) with the National Civic Art Society, we will be showcasing essays on the subject to help us prepare for the discussion. Today’s selection is by panelist and Williams College professor of art Michael J. Lewis, who writes on “The Decline of American Monuments and Memorials” in this month’s Imprimis.

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    Upcoming event: Monumental Fights

    Over the past year, the recently dedicated Martin Luther King Jr. (MLK) Memorial and the planned Eisenhower Memorial have renewed controversy about the meaning and purpose of public memorials. What do America’s memorials and monuments tell us about our nation and our identity as citizens? How should we memorialize past events and individuals? In this event, co-sponsored by the Program on American Citizenship and the National Civic Art Society, a distinguished panel will address these questions and comment on the MLK and Eisenhower memorials.

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    Monumental Egos

    In the April issue of The American Spectator, AEI’s Roger Scruton joins the long line of criticism in arguing against Frank Gehry’s design for the Eisenhower Memorial.

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    Friday Round-up

  • In their article “Restoring Civic Purpose in Schools” in Education Week, James E. Davis, H. Michael Hartoonian, Richard D. Van Scotter, and William E. White, authors of the Colonial Williamsburg History and Civics Project, argue for the importance of civic education in schools.
  • The National Conference on Citizenship (NCoC) has released another state’s civic health index, this time focusing on Kentucky.
  • The Washington Examiner reports that “A congressional subcommittee has scheduled a hearing on the controversial design proposed for the Eisenhower Memorial.”
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